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Making the Holidays Happy For Everyone: 10 Easy Ways to Make Holiday Celebrations More Accessible for Autistic People

Virtually everything about this season is antithetical to neurodivergent neurology; the bright lights, strong smells, loud music, busy shops, gatherings of family and loved ones and higher than normal expectations to socialize for long periods of time (to name a few.) All things considered, the holiday season is something many neurodivergent people dread, myself included. …

Why I Can’t (and Won’t) Shut Up About Being Autistic

I am wired to discuss things which make others uncomfortable, not because I take any pleasure in making others uncomfortable (I actually hate it) but because I see no point in skirting meaningful exchanges in service of perpetuating an illusory status quo. I see no point to existence if we are not discussing real issues that matter or learning from one another or the world around us.

Neurotypical vs Neurodivergent: Who Really Has the Empathy Problem?

… But do these things translate into a person who is incapable of experiencing or expressing empathy? Or do these things simply suggest that without explicit, clear communication of another person’s “feelings, thoughts and experiences” that there is sometimes insufficient shared experience between individuals of distinct neurotypes for one to be able to experience empathy for the other? And is this inability to decipher cues from a foreign social language a true one way street, or do the native speakers of each of these social languages have difficulties deciphering and empathizing with the experiences of the other?

Capitalism, Ableism, and a Call For Compassion

I don’t have an idea for the replacement of capitalism, and I’m not necessarily advocating for one. It would be futile to do so, anyway, before humanity had found its heart again, for any system would inevitably just result in continued oppression for marginalized people. …a good first step would be to inspect ourselves for internalized ableism, to challenge the belief that only those who live without physical or mental disability are worthy of surviving, and to try to find our hearts again in a heartless system.

Why Do You Need a Label, Anyway?

Autism still exists even if it is not discussed or described by language. You do not cure someone of being autistic by removing labels from their experience. Other labels come in to fill the vacuum, labels we didn’t choose for ourselves, labels which are based on fundamental misunderstandings, labels that deny us help, accommodations, and acceptance, labels that cause actual harm to us in the form of prejudice, violence and higher instances of suicide.

Welcome to The Autistic Ambassador!

Hi! My name is Kai.

I created The Autistic Ambassador (TAA) blog to facilitate cultural exchange between neurotypes.

A “neurotype” refers to a group of people who share commonalities in the ways that their brains develop and function. There are two main neurotypes – people with neuro-divergent brain development and function, and people with neuro-typical brain development and function. As their names might suggest, the latter is most common or “typical” neurotype while the former is a smaller population which differs from the majority.

I am personally a member of the neurodivergent community as multiply-neurodivergent person and parent of two neurodivergent children. I am also married to a neurotypical person. Being part of this inter-abled relationship has been instrumental in demonstrating for me both the need for this cultural exchange between neurotypes and the rewards of working towards it, and serves as a living model and source support for which I am deeply grateful.

The ultimate goal is to facilitate cultural exchange between neurotypes, and that is not a one-way street. TAA aims to serve as an intermediary between the neurodivergent community and the neurotypical community, and to help each better comprehend where the other is coming from.


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